Landscapes and representation: (re) mapping the Flinders Ranges

Authors

  • Gini Lee
  • Jillian Walliss

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.34900/lr.v7i1.94

Abstract

The landscape is itself a text that is open to interpretation and transformation... It is the well-formed world of occupied places as opposed to the world outside of that - the unplaced place. In other words, prior to language, "landscape" is a phenomenon beyond immediate comprehension; it is not until we choose a prospect and map what we see, marking some aspects, ignoring others that landscape acquires meaning. Such interventions include paintings, poems, myths, and literature, in addition to buildings and other interventions upon the land (Corner 1991 p 129).

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Published

2001-03-01

How to Cite

Lee, G., & Walliss, J. . (2001). Landscapes and representation: (re) mapping the Flinders Ranges. Landscape Review, 7(1), 44–55. https://doi.org/10.34900/lr.v7i1.94

Issue

Section

Reflection