Landscape as ulpan: the development of an Israeli landscape architecture language

Authors

  • Kenneth Helphand

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.34900/lr.v4i2.57

Abstract

Israel is a new nation with ancient roots. Over the past century the Zionist return to the land and the building of a modern nation has had a counterpart in language: the revitalisation of Hebrew as spoken tongue. There is a design analogy with the immigrant process, learning Hebrew, and ulpan (language classes for new immigrants).' Designers too, have learned the basics of the landscape language, appreciated its character and nuance, and found out how to be expressive within its vocabulary and structure. For Israeli landscape architects there has been a conscious search for a language of landscape design. As a result of this quest, a palette of identifiable materials, forms, compositions, and functions has emerged, and these have been used to create a design narrative which speaks of Israel's complex national culture and identity. This paper explores the continuing process through a case study of one landscape space, the wadi/nahal.

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Published

1997-10-01

How to Cite

Helphand, K. (1997). Landscape as ulpan: the development of an Israeli landscape architecture language. Landscape Review, 4(2), 16–26. https://doi.org/10.34900/lr.v4i2.57

Issue

Section

Reflection